Radiomics Utilization to Differentiate Nonfunctional Adenoma in Essential Hypertension and Functional Adenoma in Primary Aldosteronism

Abstract/Summary:

We performed the present study to investigate the role of computed tomography (CT) radiomics in differentiating nonfunctional adenoma and aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) and outcome prediction in patients with clinically suspected primary aldosteronism (PA). This study included 60 patients diagnosed with essential hypertension (EH) with nonfunctional adenoma on CT and 91 patients with unilateral surgically proven APA. Each whole nodule on unenhanced and venous phase CT images was segmented manually and randomly split into training and test sets at a ratio of 8:2. Radiomic models for nodule discrimination and outcome prediction of APA after adrenalectomy were established separately using the training set by least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) logistic regression, and the performance was evaluated on test sets. The model can differentiate adrenal nodules in EH and PA with a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 83.3%, 78.9% and 80.6% (AUC = 0.91 [0.72, 0.97]) in unenhanced CT and 81.2%, 100% and 87.5% (AUC = 0.98 [0.77, 1.00]) in venous phase CT, respectively. In the outcome after adrenalectomy, the models showed a favorable ability to predict biochemical success (Unenhanced/venous CT: AUC = 0.67 [0.52, 0.79]/0.62 [0.46, 0.76]) and clinical success (Unenhanced/venous CT: AUC = 0.59 [0.47, 0.70]/0.64 [0.51, 0.74]). The results showed that CT-based radiomic models hold promise to discriminate APA and nonfunctional adenoma when an adrenal incidentaloma was detected on CT images of hypertensive patients in clinical practice, while the role of radiomic analysis in outcome prediction after adrenalectomy needs further investigation.

Authors: Po-Ting Chen, Dawei Chang, Kao-Lang Liu, Wei-Chih Liao, Weichung Wang, Chin-Chen Chang, Vin-Cent Wu, Yen-Hung Lin
Keywords: adenoma, diagnostic imaging
DOI Number: 10.1038/s41598-022-12835-9      Publication Year: 2022

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©2021-22
Primary Aldosteronism Foundation

The Primary Aldosteronism Foundation is a registered 501(c)(3) public charity. Donations are tax deductible in the US.

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