US NIH Research Program

Part of the Department of Health and Human Services, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the primary US government agency responsible for biomedical and public health research.

Through its Extramural Research Program, NIH supports scientists working at universities and institutions across the US and in some foreign countries. A small portion of the NIH budget (less than 10%) is dedicated to intramural research conducted on campus in Bethesda, Maryland.

Compared with other diseases, external research teams working on primary aldosteronism receive very little funding from NIH, and intramural programs do not include any study solely dedicated to adrenal gland tumors.

Evaluation of Adults with Endocrine and Metabolic-Related Conditions

This clinical trial is currently recruiting at NIH’s headquarters in Bethesda, MD. Most participants will attend a medical visit, and may have tests, surgery, or other procedures to help diagnose or treat their condition.

Eligibility criteria include age and suspicion of endocrine disorder.

To inquire about participation in the study, patients are invited to contact:
Marissa F Lightbourne, M.D.
Phone: +1 (301) 827-1481
Email: marissa.lightbourne@nih.gov

Prospective Comprehensive Molecular Analysis of Endocrine Neoplasms

This additional study, also conducted at NIH’s headquarters in Bethesda, MD, may be of interest to some patients with primary aldosteronism since it is tailored to individuals who have a tumor in or around their adrenal gland and/or other parts of the endocrine system.

Eligibility criteria include radiographic evidence of the endocrine neoplasm.

To inquire about participation in the study, patients are invited to contact:
Naris Nilubol, M.D.
Phone: +1 (240) 760-6154
Email: niluboln@mail.nih.gov

Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Primary Aldosteronism in Blacks

Individuals of African descent are at higher risk of developing primary aldosteronism. This study is conducted at NIH’s headquarters in Bethesda, MD, and focuses on the genes that may cause primary aldosteronism in Black individuals. Participants who qualify may undergo diagnosis and surgery.

Eligibility criteria include self-described Black race, evidence supportive of primary aldosteronism (e.g., hypertension), and being able to return to NIH for follow-up evaluation.

To inquire about participation in the study, patients are invited to contact:
Crystal Dawn C Kamilaris, M.D.
Phone: +1 (301) 402-3699
Email: crystal.kamilaris@nih.gov